The Journey with Ron Moore
Devotion Text

Luke 1:39-45

In those days Mary arose and went with haste into the hill country, to a town in Judah, and she entered the house of Zechariah and greeted Elizabeth. And when Elizabeth heard the greeting of Mary, the baby leaped in her womb. And Elizabeth was filled with the Holy Spirit, and she exclaimed with a loud cry, “Blessed are you among women, and blessed is the fruit of your womb! And why is this granted to me that the mother of my Lord should come to me? For behold, when the sound of your greeting came to my ears, the baby in my womb leaped for joy. And blessed is she who believed that there would be a fulfillment of what was spoken to her from the Lord.”

After the angel, Gabriel, told Mary that she would be with child, she hurried to see her cousin, Elizabeth. Gabriel had told Mary that Elizabeth was going to have a baby in her old age. Mary went to see Elizabeth for confirmation. Gabriel said that Elizabeth was six months along, so the pregnancy would be evident.

Mary needed to see with her own eyes that the person who had been unable to conceive and was well past childbearing years was now pregnant. If God could perform a miracle with Elizabeth, a virgin birth was not out of the question. When Mary arrived, she saw the proof. Elizabeth’s baby “leaped for joy,” in her womb. Filled with the Holy Spirit, Elizabeth proclaimed that Mary was blessed and would be the mother of the Lord.

When God calls us to do great things, he gives us proof that he is at work. In the Old Testament, he proved himself to Moses, Joshua, and Gideon. In the New Testament, he proved himself to the disciples and Paul on the road to Damascus. God seldom calls us to step out with blind faith. He graciously demonstrates that he is at work and his word is true. He did it for Mary; he’ll do it for you.

Talking to God

Father, thank you for providing the truth I need to follow hard after you. In Jesus’ name. Amen.

 

For parents: Share with your children a time when God provided proof for something he was calling you to do. We would love to hear your “proof story” as well. Send it to us at prayer@ronmoore.org.

 


 

This Week on The Journey Broadcast:

 

Reflecting the Glory

Devotion Text

Colossians 1:1-6

Paul, an apostle of Christ Jesus by the will of God, and Timothy our brother, To the saints and faithful brothers in Christ at Colossae: Grace to you and peace from God our Father. We always thank God, the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, when we pray for you, since we heard of your faith in Christ Jesus and of the love that you have for all the saints, because of the hope laid up for you in heaven. Of this you have heard before in the word of the truth, the gospel, which has come to you, as indeed in the whole world it is bearing fruit and increasing—as it also does among you, since the day you heard it and understood the grace of God in truth.

There are some things you never want to hear. For instance, you never want to hear a surgeon say, “Whoops!” during surgery. With your mouth propped wide open, you never want to hear a dentist say, “Now which tooth was I supposed to pull?” You never want to hear the coach of a college basketball team that won one game and lost twenty-nine say, “Yeah, but the good news is that next year we have everybody back!” But here is the worst. You never want to hear a person who professes to be a Christian say, “Really, there has been no change in my life.”

The gospel of Jesus Christ is more than truth. It is a dynamic power that changes a person from the inside out. I love the way William Wilberforce—the primary person behind the abolition of the slave trade in Great Britain—described his coming to Christ. He called it the “great change.” The gospel changes things!

Paul says to the believers in Colossae, “…[W]e heard of your faith in Christ Jesus and of the love that you have for all the saints….” Paul did not hear of these things because the Colossian Christians believed their faith was “a private matter.” Paul heard of their faith and love because they were demonstrating visible acts of faith and love. Their invisible inward change resulted in visible outward action. Paul wrote that all over the world the dynamic power of the gospel was “bearing fruit!” Are you bearing spiritual fruit? Is anyone hearing about your faith and love?

Talking to God

Father, may I demonstrate your power with my life. May my family and friends see my faith lived out daily. May all see a “great change.” In Jesus’ name. Amen.

 


 

Today on The Journey Broadcast:

 

Community – What Is It?

Devotion Text

2 Corinthians 12:9

But he said to me, “My grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness.” Therefore, I will boast all the more gladly of my weaknesses, so that the power of Christ may rest upon me.

Do you have something that drags you down? Maybe it’s a chronic illness or an unhealthy relationship. Maybe you are stuck in a job that is neither satisfying nor fulfilling. Maybe you are estranged from a son or daughter. You have prayed and prayed…and yet no answer seems to be coming.

If you have an ongoing prayer for an ongoing need, then you can relate to the apostle Paul. Although we don’t know what Paul’s “thorn in the flesh” was, we know he wanted it out of his life. In three separate times of intense prayer, he asked God to take it away. But each time God said, “No.” God used the “thorn” to keep Paul depending on him. The “thorn” was a continual reminder of Paul’s need and God’s provision of sufficient grace.

We don’t invite challenging times into our lives. And when they come, we pray for God to take them away. But sometimes he doesn’t. That isn’t because he has forgotten you, lost interest in you, or doesn’t care for you. God never wastes our time. He is reminding you that he is all you need, that his grace is abundant, and that he shows up with great power in your weakness. Like Paul, you can say, “For when I am weak, then I am strong.”

Talking to God

Father, thank you for the thorns. That is hard to say. And I pray that you will take my thorn away (name the specific challenge). Show your awesome power through my weakness and inadequacy. In Jesus’ name. Amen.

 


 

This Week on The Journey Broadcast:

 

Community

Devotion Text

Acts 9:3-4

Now as he went on his way, he approached Damascus, and suddenly a light from heaven shone around him. And falling to the ground, he heard a voice saying to him, “Saul, Saul, why are you persecuting me?”

In a moment! Just like that! A light from heaven and Saul fell to the ground.

Saul was intent on destroying the church, “breathing threats and murder against the disciples of the Lord.” He made house calls on Christians, dragging men and women off to prison. He approvingly supervised the stoning of Stephen. And he was on his way to Damascus to dispense more damage when God stopped him in his tracks. You know the rest of the story. Saul trusted in Christ, God changed his name to Paul, and the last of the apostles took the message of Jesus throughout the world. And…he wrote thirteen of the twenty-seven books in the New Testament.

We call a change like Paul’s a “Damascus Road conversion.” A person is blatantly opposed to everything Christian. They have nothing to do with Jesus and breathe hatred to all who follow Christ. Then suddenly God gets their attention. Transformation takes place.

Who do you know that is blatantly opposed to Christianity? Think of three people that need a “Damascus Road” experience? Write their name down on a piece of paper or in your smartphone notes. Put them on your prayer list. I know what you’re saying, “That person will never come to Christ!” That’s the same thing they said about Paul.

Talking to God

Father, help me obey the command of Jesus to love my enemies and pray for them. I ask that you transform the life of (name the person) just like you transformed Paul. Give (name the person) a Damascus Road experience. In Jesus’ name. Amen.

 


 

Today on The Journey Broadcast:

 

God Speaks

The Apostle Paul told us: “The weapons we fight with are not the weapons of the world. On the contrary, they have divine power to demolish strongholds.” Do you know what those weapons are?

Ron Moore and men’s minister Tunch Ilkin begin a look at the spiritual armory and talk about getting ready to do battle with divine power.

What is the Gospel?  How would you describe it?

Today, Ron Moore explains the foundation that Paul laid in Romans to address that very question. It’s the only basis upon which we can stand before God the Father.

Devotion Text

2 Corinthians 12:9

But he said to me, “My grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness.”

Do you have something that drags you down? Maybe it’s a chronic illness that tears at your body and soul. Maybe it is a relationship that is wearing you down. Maybe you are stuck in a job that is neither satisfying nor fulfilling. Maybe you are estranged from a son or daughter. You have prayed and prayed . . . and yet no answer seems to be coming.

If you have an ongoing prayer for an ongoing need, then you can relate to the apostle Paul. Although we don’t know what Paul’s “thorn in the flesh” was, we know he wanted it out of his life. In three separate times of intense prayer, he asked God to take it away. But each time God said, “No.” God used the “thorn” to keep Paul dependent on Him. The “thorn” was a continual reminder of God’s sufficient grace. It was Paul’s weakness that best demonstrated God’s strength.

We don’t invite thorns into our lives. And when they come, we pray for God to take them away. But sometimes He doesn’t. This doesn’t mean He has forgotten you, or has lost interest in you, or doesn’t care for you. God doesn’t waste your time. He is reminding you that He is all you need, that His grace is abundant, and that He shows up with great power in your weakness. Like Paul, you can say, “For when I am weak, then I am strong.”

Father, thank You for the thorns. Show Your awesome power through my weakness and inadequacy. In Jesus’ name. Amen.

Read through the Bible this year:
Today's Reading

 

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Today on The Journey Broadcast:

 

Follow Me

Devotion Text

Acts 9:3-4

As he neared Damascus on his journey, suddenly a light from heaven flashed around him. He fell to the ground and heard a voice say to him, “Saul, Saul, why do you persecute me?”

Bang! Just like that! A light from heaven and Saul fell to the ground.

Saul was intent on destroying the church, “breathing out murderous threats against the Lord’s disciples.” Dragging men and women off to prison, he made house calls on Christians. He approvingly supervised the stoning of Stephen. And Saul was on his way to Damascus to level some more damage when God stopped him in his tracks. You know the rest of the story. Saul trusted in Christ, God changed his name to Paul, and the last one of the Apostles took the message of Jesus throughout the world. And . . . he wrote thirteen of the twenty-seven books in the New Testament!

We call a change like Paul’s a “Damascus Road conversion.” A person is blatantly opposed to everything Christian. They have nothing to do with Jesus. They breathe hatred to all who follow Christ. Then suddenly God gets their attention and they become a follower of Jesus.

Whom do you know who is blatantly opposed to Christianity? Think of a person that needs a “Damascus Road” experience. Our job is not to hate or damn them. Jesus said that our job is to love and pray for them (Matthew 5:44). Write the person’s name down. Put them on your prayer list. I know what you’re saying, “This person will never come to Christ!” That’s the same thing people said about Paul.

Father, help me obey the command of Jesus to love my enemies and pray for them. I do that right now. I ask that You bring _____________________ to Yourself. Cause ______________________ to trust in You. Give _______________________ a Damascus Road experience. In Jesus’ name. Amen.

Read through the Bible this year:
Today's Reading

 

Join Our Facebook Group

 

 


 

Today on The Journey Broadcast:

 

Fearing God – Part 2

Devotion Text

2 Chronicles 16:12

In the thirty-ninth year of his reign Asa was afflicted with a disease in his feet. Though his disease was severe, even in his illness he did not seek help from the LORD, but only from the physicians.

How does it happen? How does a person follow hard after God for many years and then blow it at the end? Do we start believing that success is of our own doing? Do we become worn out by obedience? When does pride drive out humility?

Asa, the king of Judah, was a bold reformer. He did “what was good and right in the eyes of the Lord.” He led the people to enter into a covenant “to seek the Lord . . . with all their soul and all their heart.” Asa even deposed his own grandmother “because she made a repulsive Asherah pole.” Then something snapped . . . spiritually speaking. In his last years, he made a treaty with a pagan king. When God sent a prophet to confront him, Asa became “so enraged that he put [the prophet] in prison” and “brutally oppressed some of the people.”  But in today’s passage, we learn that during his illness, “he did not seek help from the Lord.”

What causes the best days of one’s life to be seen only in the rearview mirror? Asa is a great reminder that any one of us can blow it. In the words of the apostle Paul, we need to strain toward what is ahead and “press on toward the goal to win the prize for which God has called me heavenward in Christ Jesus” (Philippians 3:14).

Dear Father, may it not be said of me that my best spiritual days are behind me. Please give me the strength and focus to press on to win the prize. Whatever has happened in the past, I pray that my best spiritual days are ahead. In Jesus’ name. Amen.

 

Read through the Bible this year:
Today's Reading

 

Join Our Facebook Group

 

 


 

Today on The Journey Broadcast:

 

Living Hope: Hope

A rail car will rust away when left by itself on a side-track. But when it’s fully engaged to a powerful locomotive it can carry precious cargo and climb distant mountains.

Today Ron Moore proclaims that that kind of power is available to the believer, as revealed by Paul in the book of Colossians.

He was under house arrest…chained to centurions…living a life that everyone dreams about…his days filled with purpose and great joy.

Today, Ron Moore shares the secret of living that kind of life, as demonstrated by the Apostle Paul and outlined in a short prison-letter to his brothers and sisters in Christ.

How does your church deal with conflicting values and views? What happens when one believer thinks something to be permissible and another thinks it to be sin?

Ron Moore shares Paul’s guidelines in dealing with those gray areas of Christian conduct.

We have a problem…a big one. God is holy and we are not.

To underscore that reality, in this half-hour, Ron Moore introduces us to the Apostle Paul’s teaching on the nature of sin and its consequences for all of us.

What is the Gospel? How would you describe it?

Ron Moore explains the foundation that Paul laid in Romans to address that very question. It is the only basis upon which we can stand before God the Father.

As you look across the vast expanse of the Gospel message one book rises above the rest.

Ron Moore offers an overview of its landscape. It’s in preparation for a sojourn through this book…a letter from Paul that has influenced most of the revivals and reformations of the Christian era.

Prayer

Do you need prayer?

Email prayer@ronmoore.org.

RON’S SERMONS

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